Contacts:

Davis/Sacramento Go Club
c/o Frank Berkenkotter
Box 4, Guinda, CA 95637

Frank Berkenkotter .....796-3582
Jim Marable ................753-9723
Will Haynes .................929-6112

On-Line at http://www.dcn.davis.ca.us/~jlm/go.html [Ed. note: this address is outdated.]


Next Tournament:


Tourney Site Update

Our next tournament will be at the Davis Branch of the Yolo Public Library on December 1, 1996, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., at 315 E. 14th St. From I-80, go north on Hwy 113 to the Covell off-ramp, right (east) to F St. (about one mile), right one block to E. 14th, turn right. Library is on the right past the school. Fee of $2. Bring lunch and drinks, no food in room. Ample parking, food a few blocks away.


AGA Membership

The club is an American Go Association affiliate. If you are interested in being a personal member of the AGA (dues are $25.00/year) write: American Go Association, P.O. Box 397, Old Chelsea Station, New York, NY 10113.


1996 Numbers:


RESULTS OF TOURNAMENT

On September 21st, from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., the D/SGC held its third tournament of 1996 and its first at the Sacramento State University Student Union. 23 players played.

In Division I, Sawada broke a tie with his victory over Burrall, both with 3-1 records.

In Division II, Abronson continued his winning ways with a 4-0 rec-ord, and T. Corbett was second and promoted to 4 kyu. In Division III, Rich "6 kyu for life" Newbold was first by virtue of his victory over J. Hughes – both with 3-1 records. Our thanks to Will Haynes for getting the Sacramento State room for us.

Should there be some rule changes? Should the winners of divisions II and III automatically be promoted? Only if undefeated? Except by self-promotion, how does a kyu player move to shodan (1 Dan)? Let me know your opinions. (Frank Berkenkotter.)

Division I

  1. Sawada, 4D ..............3-1
  2. Burrall, 3D ................3-1
  3. C. Youn, 2D .............2-2
  4. D. Kent, 1D ..............2-2
  5. Haynes, 1k ................2-2
  6. Scammon, 1k ............1-3
  7. Redmond, 2D ............1-2

Division II

  1. Abronson 2k............... 4-0
  2. Corbett, 5k*............... 3-1
  3. Harris, 2k ...................3-1
  4. P. Kent, 2k .................2-2
  5. Newmiller, 3k .............1-3
  6. Char. So, 3k ...............1-3
  7. Moore, 3k ..................1-1
  8. F.. Berkenkotter, 3k ....0-4

(* - promoted to 4k)

Division III

  1. Newbold, 6k ...............3-1
  2. Hughs, 8k ....................3-1
  3. Crawford, 8k ...............2-2
  4. Sniegowski, 11k ...........2-2
  5. Berdner, 9k ..................2-2
  6. Kreiss, 12k ..................1-2
  7. Okada, 7k ...................0-3


Club Standings

Division I

  1. Haynes, 1k ....................7-5
  2. Redmond, 2D ................4-7
  3. D. Kent, 1D ..................4-8
  4. (3 tied
  5. -- with 3 wins each)

Division II

  1. Abronson, 8k ..............10-1
  2. P. Kent, 2k ...................8-4
  3. J. Hughes, 8k ................8-3
  4. Corbett, 4k ...................6-5
  5. Newmiller, 3k ...............6-6


D/SGC Members in S. F. Tournament (8/30-9/1)

These results validate our club ratings.


Report From Euro-Go Congresso, Italy

Top three places in the open com-petition:

  1. Guo Juan, 7D ..............10-0
  2. Rob. Van Jeiyst .............8-2
  3. Lee Hyuk ......................7-3

Juan and Van Jeiyst are from the Netherlands, and Hyuk is from Korea. Over 500 players were in attendance and there were more women and children playing than in 1995. I (Berkenkotter) played as a 5 kyu since European ratings are tougher than U. S. ratings. I won 4 and lost 6 (with 2 give-aways). The Congress was held in Abano Terme, a resort town in Roman times as it is today, about 8 miles from historic Padova, and 30 miles west of Venice. We also visited Firenze (Florence) about 100 miles south. Next year’s Euro-Go Congress will be in Marseilles, France.


Proposed 1997 Tourney Schedule

Submit proposals for changes by December 4th, 1996. Do we want simuls? If so they will have to be held at someone’s home, or at a free location as rental puts the total fee out of reach. The Davis Public Library is free while they are open, but chancy as it is first-come, first-served. Let me know your thoughts.


Monitors to Run Tournaments?

I (Berkenkotter) would like to play 3 tournaments just as a player, but volunteer to run one tournament. Will Haynes, I presume, will run one tournament, and Tom Corbett has expressed interest. Is there one more person who can volunteer?


Player Biography: Will Haynes, 2 kyu

Education: BA 1967, MA 1977 Theatre Arts. Employment: Air Force officer, taxi cab driver, thea-tre technician lighting designer, lecturer. My first contact with Go was in 1970 at Clear AFS in Alaska. I learned the game from someone who knew very little about the game, but like myself, enjoyed playing a variety of games. We used a grocery bag as a board and smooth pebbles from a nearby stream bed as ‘stones.’ Between then and about 1980, my only contact with the game was reading any book I could find on the sub-ject and trying to con my friends into learning. As a result, I have at least one copy of nearly every Go book published by Ishi Press.

In about 1980, I found the Go club in San Francisco (when they were still on the bottom floor of the synagogue). I played there when I could and I also found some play-ers in Sacramento. I was rated about 11 kyu at my first tournament in San Francisco and it has only taken me about 15 years to get to 1 kyu. (I am a slow learner.)

I have had the pleasure of attend-ing three U. S. Go Congresses (in Salem, Oregon; South Hadley, Massachusetts; and Seattle, Washington). Listening to the analysis by the Japanese, Chinese, Korean and American profession-als is instructive, even if I can’t always apply it to my games. It is also fun to renew friendships with Go players from across the nation. I would recommend attending a Congress if you can.

Two summers ago, I went on a tour to Japan and, while in Kyoto, I had the pleasure of playing Go in two different Go clubs. I was playing at about 3 kyu at that time and I managed to win about half my games. I look forward to playing Go again in Japan.


Inuit-ive Concept of Competition

"The Inuit (Indians) played a free-wheeling version of soccer in which everyone from toddlers to grandparents gave the ball an im-pressive kick in any direction. When a newly arrived Southerner tried to teach formal soccer, with opposing sides and winners and losers, the Inuits declined to learn.

"Trying to beat their neighbors, why would they try to do a thing like that? They depended on their neighbors who in turn depended on them. Besides that, beating an-other person would be nothing but a shameful embarrassment to any-one."


Davis/Sacramento Go Club Newsletter


Modified last on November 14, 1997 by Jeff Newmiller.
(Comments and suggestions welcome.)

Davis/Sacramento Go Club Homepage